Zaunkoenig M2K manual

Overview of M2K default values

The M2K uses the PixArt 3360 sensor. The default values of the M2K are the same as they were on the M1K: Per default Angle Snapping is disabled, LOD is set to 2 millimeters, CPI is set to 800 and the polling rate is set to 1,000 hertz.

Thanks to using the best available 3360 firmware version (also called SROM, or «secure read-only memory») the 3360 inside the M2K has just 2 frames of smoothing for CPI values of 100 up to 3,500. From 3,600 CPI to 12,000 CPI however the smoothing jumps to 16 frames. We thus recommend not going above 3,500 CPI.

You can change CPI, polling rate, Angle Snapping and lift of distance (LOD) without having to install any software on your PC. See the following for how to do that.

Changing CPI, polling rate, Angle Snapping and LOD

Changing CPI on your M2K

You can change CPI in steps of 100. Like so:

  1. Plug the M2K into your PC.
  2. Lift the M2K a few centimeters off your mousepad so it stops tracking.
  3. Hold down both mouse buttons for five seconds.
  4. The M2K now enters the so-called «CPI programming mode». Upon entering the mouse cursor will move to show you at what CPI the M2K is currently at. The standard value of the M2K is 800 CPI. So when you enter the CPI programming mode with a brand new M2K the mouse cursor will go up and down exactly eight times. At 1,400 CPI the mouse cursor would move to the right and back once (indicating 1,000 CPI), and then up and down four times (indicating 400 CPI).
  5. Now place the M2K back on your mousepad. You can now change the CPI by pressing either the left or right mouse button. Each time you now press your left mouse button, the CPI will be decreased by 100 until you reach the minimum CPI value of 100. Pressing right increases CPI by 100. While you are doing this you can move the M2K around to get a feeling for different CPI values.
  6. If you want to increase CPI by 1,000 you can use the following shortcut: hold down the left mouse button and press right. The mouse cursor makes a bigger jump to indicate the increase. Switch buttons to do the same for decreasing CPI by 1,000.
  7. You exit the CPI mode the same way you entered it: Lift the M2K a few centimeters off your mousepad so it stops tracking and hold down both mouse buttons for five seconds.
  8. The M2K exits CPI programming mode and tells you again at what CPI it is running now. Say you set the mouse to 700 CPI: the mouse cursor now will move up and down seven times. After the mouse cursor has stopped moving the M2K is ready to go.

M2K @ 8,000 hertz polling rate

The M2K can do driverless 8,000 hertz. The default mode of the M2K is 1,000 hertz via USB Full Speed however. You can switch to 8,000 hertz via USB High Speed by plugging in the M2K with the left and right mouse button held down. The cursor on your screen will do a figure eight to indicate the change (you can now let go of the buttons :P). Should you want to switch back to 1,000 hertz via USB Full Speed repeat the above procedure. The cursor on your screen will move to the right and down to indicate the change.

Alternatively you can cycle through different hertz levels with your M2K without having to plug your M2K out. Note that your M2K has to be set to 8,000 hertz in order to being able to do that though. This is how you can enter «hertz programming mode»: hold up your M2K so that the sensor stops tracking and press down the middle mouse button for five seconds. Your M2K is now entering hertz programming mode and upon doing so it will indicate at how much hertz it is currently set to by moving the cursor up and down again. Example: when set to 8,000 hertz the mouse cursor will move up and down eight times in a row.

Once you have entered hertz programming mode you can put your M2K back on your mousepad. You can now cycle through the following hertz levels by scrolling in the direction of the cable (increasing hertz) or by scrolling in the direction of your hand (decreasing hertz). Increasing hertz is indicated by your cursor jumping up and down; vice versa reducing hertz is indicated by your cursor jumping down and up. The following hertz values are available: 1,000 hertz, 2,000 hertz, 4,000 hertz as well as 8,000 hertz.

You can cycle through hertz values in your actual game of choice, which is useful if you want to test out whether 8,000 hertz results in the game stuttering but 4,000 hertz not, for example. Say you switch from 8,000 hertz down to 4,000 hertz by scrolling towards your hand: your mouse cursor will jump down and up again four times, indicating that you lowered hertz by 4,000.

You can exit hertz programming mode by holding up your M2K and pressing down your middle mouse button for five seconds. Upon exiting hertz programming mode the M2K will again tell you at how many hertz it is currently running. Say you set your M2K to 2,000 hertz and now are exiting hertz programming mode; in that case the cursor will move up and down exactly two times.

A word about measuring 8,000 hertz: when you measure the USB update rate with a tool, chances are your M2K will be shown as hovering around 4,000 hertz. The reason for this is simple: the sensor in the M2K essentially is a small digital video camera that runs with a certain frame rate. Your normal iPhone camera shoots video at 30 or 60 frames per second (FPS). The FPS of the sensor in the M2K (PixArt 3360) depends on how quickly you move your mouse around. The 3360 has four FPS steps: 4,100; 4,900; 5,900 as well as 11,600. Only for very quick movements (roughly one meter per second) will the FPS actually be 11,600. For most of your movements the FPS will thus be either 4,100 or 4,900 or 5,900 FPS.

Say the 3360 in your M2K is running with 5,900 FPS while you are trying to measure the update rate of your M2K. It will now appear that the M2K is running with 5,900 hertz. That does not mean that the M2K is not capable of doing 8,000 hertz however. The M2K firmware is programmed in a way that the M2K will only transmit sensor data if there is new sensor data. And when the 3360 only has 5,900 new data points each second instead of 8,000 new data points each second, it will appear that the M2K is running with just 5,900 hertz.

Unfortunately there is nothing you or Zaunkoenig can do about this: PixArt does not allow it to modify the FPS of its sensors, unless your name is Logitech or Razer.

Finally: clicks will always profit from 8,000 hertz, since the switches in the M2K are sampled continously.

Changing Angle Snapping and LOD on the M2K

To activate Angle Snapping, press and hold the middle mouse button while plugging in the M2K. Cursor moves clockwise in a square to indicate the change. To disable Angle Snapping, repeat the same procedure; this time the cursor will do the square counterclockwise.

To set the LOD to 3 millimeters plug in the M2K while holding down the left mouse button: cursor will do three clockwise squares to indicate change. Repeat the procedure for changing the LOD to 2 millimeters; this time the cursor will move counterclockwise in a square for two times.

Entering firmware programming mode on the M2K

Note that you only have to install firmware programming mode when you want to install a new firmware version on the M2K. The following explains how to enter firmware programming mode on the M2K.

Hold down the right mouse button while plugging in the M2K and keep the right mouse button down for at least three seconds. Once your mouse cursor has frozen you know that you have successfully entered the firmware programming mode of the M2K.

Opening up the M2K

Opening up the M2K is not trivial. This is the downside of miniaturization. ;)

The good news however is that you do not have to remove mouse feet on the M2K if you want to open it up.

You will need a T6 as well as a T4 Torx screwdriver.

The PCB of the M2K is actually two PCBs connected by something called a Board-to-Board connector. The so-called daughter PCB consists of only the wheel encoder, the switch for the middle mouse button and a Board-to-Board connector. Should you want to save a cool 3 grams you can remove this daughter PCB from the main PCB. Should you change your mind and want to add in the daughter PCB again you have to be very careful when mating the daughter PCB with the main PCB: you have to align the two Board-to-Board connectors very accurately before pressing them together. Be warned. ;)

Zaunkoenig M1K manual

Configuring an M1K is very similar to configuring an M2K. This is a short overview of where M1K configuration is different.

 

M1K @ 8,000 hertz polling rate

Internally the M1K runs with 8,000 hertz. The only way for Windows to take full advantage of that is to overclock your Windows driver to 8,000 hertz. See this two minute long tutorial for how to pull that off. Also check out SweetLows overclock.net thread about 8,000 hertz: «USB mouse hard overclocking (2000 Hz+)»

Be warned: the 8,000 hertz overclock for the M1K is not easy to pull off.

Changing Angle Snapping and LOD on the M1K

To activate Angle Snapping, press and hold the left button while plugging in the M1K. Cursor moves clockwise in a square to indicate the change.

To set LOD to 3 millimeters, press the right button while plugging in the M1K. Cursor moves clockwise in a square to indicate change.

To go back to default settings, press both buttons while plugging in the M1K: Angle Snapping now is disabled again and LOD is set to 2 millimeters. Cursor moves counterclockwise in a square to indicate the change.

Entering firmware programming mode on the M1K

You can enter firmware programming mode by plugging in the M1K while at the same time holding down both mouse buttons for at least five seconds. You will know you have entered firmware programming mode when your mouse cursor has frozen.

Check out the official Zaunkoenig GitHub page for more information on the M1K firmware.

Opening up the M1K

Only open the M1K when you know what you are doing, as putting it back together is tricky. The threads in the M1K survive roughly ten to twenty opening procedures. Here is a video of none other than Beardedbob opening up an M1K. If you wanna go ahead with opening up the M1K you need a T6 Torx screwdriver. Once you have loosened the four screws of the bottom shell push the cable a little inside the M1K and gently pull on the bottom shell. Be careful when screwing the M1K back together: if you tighten the screws too much you can damage the M1K. To prevent a wobbly bottom shell you have to tighten the four bottom shell screws with the same amount of force.

FCC

The Zaunkoenig M1K as well as M2K comply with 47 CFR Part 15. Our FCC partner in the US: Michelle Construction, 7575 Hillcrest Avenue Manitou Beach, Michigan, 49253, chuck@michelleconstruction.com